Influence of Electrical Activity on Dynamical and Microphysical Processes in Thunderstorms
Received:October 23, 2018  
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KeyWord:Thunderstorm  Electric field  Dynamical field  Microphysical field  Numerical simulation
Author NameAffiliationE-mail
LIAN Chunhao Key Laboratory of Meteorological Disaster, Ministry of Education (KLME)/ Joint International Research Laboratory of Climate and Environment Change (ILCEC)/Collaborative Innovation Center on Forecast and Evaluation of Meteorological Disasters (CIC-FEMD)/ Key Laboratory for Aerosol-Cloud-Precipitation of China Meteorological Administration, Nanjing University of Information Science &
Technology, Nanjing 210044 
 
GUO Fengxia Key Laboratory of Meteorological Disaster, Ministry of Education (KLME)/ Joint International Research Laboratory of Climate and Environment Change (ILCEC)/Collaborative Innovation Center on Forecast and Evaluation of Meteorological Disasters (CIC-FEMD)/ Key Laboratory for Aerosol-Cloud-Precipitation of China Meteorological Administration, Nanjing University of Information Science &
Technology, Nanjing 210044 
guofx@nuist.edu.cn 
ZENG Fanhui Key Laboratory of Meteorological Disaster, Ministry of Education (KLME)/ Joint International Research Laboratory of Climate and Environment Change (ILCEC)/Collaborative Innovation Center on Forecast and Evaluation of Meteorological Disasters (CIC-FEMD)/ Key Laboratory for Aerosol-Cloud-Precipitation of China Meteorological Administration, Nanjing University of Information Science &
Technology, Nanjing 210044 
 
GAN Mingjun Key Laboratory of Meteorological Disaster, Ministry of Education (KLME)/ Joint International Research Laboratory of Climate and Environment Change (ILCEC)/Collaborative Innovation Center on Forecast and Evaluation of Meteorological Disasters (CIC-FEMD)/ Key Laboratory for Aerosol-Cloud-Precipitation of China Meteorological Administration, Nanjing University of Information Science &
Technology, Nanjing 210044 
 
LI Qi Key Laboratory of Meteorological Disaster, Ministry of Education (KLME)/ Joint International Research Laboratory of Climate and Environment Change (ILCEC)/Collaborative Innovation Center on Forecast and Evaluation of Meteorological Disasters (CIC-FEMD)/ Key Laboratory for Aerosol-Cloud-Precipitation of China Meteorological Administration, Nanjing University of Information Science &
Technology, Nanjing 210044 
 
LIU Ze Key Laboratory of Meteorological Disaster, Ministry of Education (KLME)/ Joint International Research Laboratory of Climate and Environment Change (ILCEC)/Collaborative Innovation Center on Forecast and Evaluation of Meteorological Disasters (CIC-FEMD)/ Key Laboratory for Aerosol-Cloud-Precipitation of China Meteorological Administration, Nanjing University of Information Science &
Technology, Nanjing 210044 
 
ZHANG Xiaohuang Key Laboratory of Meteorological Disaster, Ministry of Education (KLME)/ Joint International Research Laboratory of Climate and Environment Change (ILCEC)/Collaborative Innovation Center on Forecast and Evaluation of Meteorological Disasters (CIC-FEMD)/ Key Laboratory for Aerosol-Cloud-Precipitation of China Meteorological Administration, Nanjing University of Information Science &
Technology, Nanjing 210044 
 
CAI Binbin Key Laboratory of Meteorological Disaster, Ministry of Education (KLME)/ Joint International Research Laboratory of Climate and Environment Change (ILCEC)/Collaborative Innovation Center on Forecast and Evaluation of Meteorological Disasters (CIC-FEMD)/ Key Laboratory for Aerosol-Cloud-Precipitation of China Meteorological Administration, Nanjing University of Information Science &
Technology, Nanjing 210044 
 
ZHANG Kun Key Laboratory of Meteorological Disaster, Ministry of Education (KLME)/ Joint International Research Laboratory of Climate and Environment Change (ILCEC)/Collaborative Innovation Center on Forecast and Evaluation of Meteorological Disasters (CIC-FEMD)/ Key Laboratory for Aerosol-Cloud-Precipitation of China Meteorological Administration, Nanjing University of Information Science &
Technology, Nanjing 210044 
 
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Abstract:
      Herein, we compare the primary simulation differences when considering the electric field effect (EFE) in the 3D dynamic-electric coupling numerical cloud model, wherein EFE was introduced into the thermodynamic equations and falling velocities of different hydrometeors. In the EFE calculations, owing to weak initial electrical activity, the dynamical field and precipitation intensity changed only slightly. With enhanced electrical activity, the updraft and downdraft speeds increased and the precipitation intensity exhibited both increase and decrease periods, whereas the total precipitation increased only slightly. Additionally, the amount of lightning nearly doubled, and it was generated earlier and lasted longer; hence, its feedback effect cannot be ignored. The results show that the peaks of the hail and graupel particles’ grid-scale mass-weighted instantaneous falling velocities were 10 m s-1 and 7 m s-1, respectively. Because of the narrow range of the strong electrical field and the direct transient effect on particles of the electric field force, the maximum falling velocities of hydrometeors only fluctuate slightly, but differences in the falling velocities are more obvious among small-size particles. By controlling the hydrometeor falling velocities, the electric field changes the particles’ primary production, increases the production rates of raindrops and ice crystals, decreases the production rates of graupel and hail, adjusts the spatiotemporal distributions of the vapor liquid and solid state hydrometeors, increases water vapor by 9% and latent heating by 7%, and provides internal energy for the further development of thunder clouds.